Frequently asked questions about abstracts

General:

  • What is an abstract?

    An abstract is a summary of a paper (research publication). The study and results reported should be novel and not simply an extension of previously published work.

  • How do I submit an abstract?

    Online – sign in to myERS, choose the ‘Abstract’ menu and select ‘Congress submission’. https://my.ersnet.org/

  • What is a late-breaking abstract?

    Abstracts that are considered as late breaking must contain novel data and this data must became available for public dissemination only after the standard abstract deadline on 11 February 2021.

    The study and results reported should be novel and not simply an extension of previously published work. The late-breaking abstract round is not designed to favour investigators who unintentionally missed the deadline for the regular abstract submission.

  • How do I submit a late breaking abstract?

    You must submit your late breaking abstract online by logging in to myERS and choosing the ‘Abstract’ menu, and then select ‘Congress submission’. The submission period for late-breaking abstract is from 1 May to 14 June 2021.

    Note that the submission is not free; a €75 submission fee applies for each late-breaking abstract submission (non-refundable). For people based in Switzerland and additional 8% VAT will apply.

  • What is a randomised controlled trial (RCT) abstract?

    The most ground-breaking RCT and very late-breaking clinical trial data from all respiratory disease areas. Best RCTs will be presented as part of the ‘Abstracts Leading to Evolution in Respiratory Medicine Trials’ sessions (ALERT).

    Note that the submission is not free; a €150 submission fee applies for each RCT abstract submission (non-refundable). For people based in Switzerland an additional 8% VAT will apply.

  • My project is still ongoing and there are no results yet, should I still submit an abstract?

    Abstracts are intended to present scientific studies and research. If your study is currently ongoing and you only have preliminary data, but it seems relevant or significant, you can submit the abstract. However please be aware that abstracts with incomplete data may have less chance of being accepted for the ERS International Congress.

    After your abstract is accepted you cannot update the content of your abstract for the official publication as the accepted version will be published, however you are permitted to present updated information onsite at the Congress.

  • How many abstracts can I submit?

    A maximum of three abstracts (including late-breaking abstracts) may be submitted by the same author.

  • Can I submit a case report study?

    We do not encourage to submit the case study abstracts, however we accept them if they are well prepared. We do not provide specific templates for this kind of abstracts. You may however consider submission of clinical cases by the 11 February, 2021 deadline.

  • Do I need to disclose information of conflict of interest in my abstract?

    Yes. When submitting your abstract, you will have the opportunity to disclose your conflict of interest. Conflict of interest statements are only required for the first author.

  • Where can I find the guidelines on how to prepare an abstract?

    You can access the instructions from this page or from the submission platform.

  • What is the required structure for an abstract?

    Title: The title should be an accurate description of the abstract’s contents. It should explain as much as possible about the context and the aims of the study. The title should be about 10–12 words long, and should include the scope of the investigation, the study design and the goal. The title should be a description of what was investigated rather than a statement of the results or conclusions. The abstract title should be easy for the reader to understand and should not include jargon or unfamiliar acronyms or abbreviations. The title should not be in capital letters.

    Authors: The list of authors should be restricted to those individuals who carried out the study, conceived it, designed it, gathered the data, analysed the numbers and wrote the abstract. The author who will present the abstract should be listed first. Every listed author should read and approve the abstract before it is submitted.

    Main text: A good abstract should address the five following questions in the relevant sections:

    1. “Why did you start?” – Introduction or background / You should summarise, preferably in one sentence, the current knowledge specifically in relation to the work you are presenting.

    2. “What did you try to do?” – Aims and objectives / State the aim of your study, and ideally include a short statement of the study’s hypothesis. A legitimate scientific study is not done “to prove that something is true” but rather “to find out whether it is true.” The distinction may seem small but it makes a significant difference. A formal hypothesis shows that you are objective.

    3. “What did you do?” – Methods / In an abstract, the description of the methods has to be concise, and much of the details of what was done must be omitted. However, in a few short sentences, you can give the reader a good idea of the design of the study, the context in which it was done, and the types of patients or measurements that were included.

    4. “What did you find?” – Results / It is important to give the main results of the study, not in subjective terms (“We found device X to be superior to device Y”) but also in the form of some real data. You will need to choose which findings to report here: it should be the most important data in your study, and the findings on which your conclusions will be based. Do not include a table or figure unless you need it to show your results.

    5. “What does it mean?” – Conclusions / Here, space constraints generally limit you to a single sentence of why you think your findings are important, and their potential implications. Keep your conclusions reasonable and supportable by the findings of your study. Remember that if your study was restricted to certain patients, or a particular therapy, or a specific device, its results may not extend beyond these restrictions.

    Please see the full guidelines for more information.

Abstract submission:

  • Can I submit an abstract that has been already presented in different event?

    We do not accept abstract which was already presented and published. However, you can submit something similar to our Congress, we expect some additions/new data to an abstract presented at another congress.

  • Who has the copyright for my abstract after submission?

    Copyright for abstracts is retained by authors (see on submission Terms & Agreement “11. Copyright, if this abstract is accepted, will be held by the author or employer (as part of the conditions of the author(s)’s employment).”)

    The abstracts are not published under a creative commons framework (Creative Commons licensing is most generally used to ‘describe’ how you can ‘use/re-use’ an open access document). The abstracts are not published open access. They are free to access (on both the ERS platforms and when they are published as a supplement of the ERJ), which is different to open access, and are copyright to the author.

  • How long should an abstract be?

    The maximum length of an abstract is 1,810 characters including characters and spaces in the following: Abstract Title, Abstract Body, Table, and Figures. N.B. if you insert a table, one character will be deducted per cell. If you insert an image/picture/figure, it will deduct 277 characters.

  • How many co-authors can I include on the authors list?

    There is no limit regarding number of authors. However, the list of authors should be restricted to those individuals who carried out the study, conceived it, designed it, gathered the data, analysed the numbers and wrote the abstract. The author who will present the abstract should be listed first. Every listed author should read and approve the abstract before it is submitted.

    All authors must have an ERS account.

  • I missed the deadline for the 1st round abstract submission. Can I submit it as a late – breaking abstract?

    The late-breaking abstract round is not the extension for the regular abstract submission deadline.